Sign Up, It's Free Log In

HOW TO PREVENT HEAT-RELATED ISSUES AT OUTDOOR EVENTS

 
shutterstock_348952283.jpg
 

THURSDAY // JUNE 14

HOW TO PREVENT HEAT-RELATED ISSUES AT OUTDOOR EVENTS

Another toasty Bonnaroo Music Festival in Tennessee has proven once again that the heat can be very unforgivable if proper precautions are not carried out. On Friday morning, a 32-year old man had been found dead inside a vehicle, with an autopsy expected to determine the cause of death, reported USA Today. Although no foul play is suspected, his death signifies the 13th fatality in Bonnaroo history.

This also really touches on the vital rule, if you see something say something. We don’t know the details of the man’s death but if we look out for each other or simply follow the buddy system, we are doing our best to prevent a tragedy.

Dozens of festival attendees had been treated for heat-related issues already on the festival’s second day with temperature of 90 degrees with a heat index of 99, Sheriff’s office spokesman Lucky Knott told USA Today. Some of these people had to be transported and treated at local hospitals.

Education is key when it comes to heat-related illness prevention and treatment. We can observe what the experts have to say in order to stay safe when outside for a number of days in a row under hot conditions.

Outlined by the Red Cross website, here are some tips on how to prevent and treat heat-related illnesses:

Prior to hitting festival grounds, you should know the locations of shade areas and also air conditioned areas for when your body is in need of a break from the heat. Know where your medical emergency services are. For Bonnaroo and most festies, the map and map on the website outlines where the 24/7 medical tents are located. If you cannot access these, there are plenty of staff to help you locate the help you need.

The following bullets come from The Red Cross website, and they really do apply to both workers and attendees in outdoor events with excessive heat conditions:  

  • The Red Cross urges you to drink water and other non-alcoholic beverages whenever possible, even if you may not feel thirsty.
  • Eat small meals and eat often
  • Wear loose-fitting, lightweight and light colored clothing. Wearing dark colors as we know only absorbs the sun’s heat causing you to feel much hotter than the next person. Those festival pants may look cute but they are not worth your well being.
  • Slow down and pace yourself. Take as many breaks as you can, and when someone in your festival crew or coworker feels overheated, don’t pressure him or her to keep up.

Red Cross website outlines three different heat-related illnesses on the body caused by heat waves. From low severity to high, they are as follows: Heat cramps, heat exhaustion and heat stroke.

Heat Cramps

What happens: muscular pains and spasms usually in the legs or abdomen

Why: Early sign the body is struggling with the heat

How to treat: Make sure the individual reaches a cooler area with a comfortable place to sit comfortably. Stretch and massage the area. Make sure they consume a beverage with electrolytes such as sports drinks, fruit juice or milk. Avoid salt tablets at all costs.   

Heat Exhaustion

Who: This one affects athletes, firefighters, construction workers, factory workers and people wearing heavy clothing in the heat and humidity.

What happens: Look for person with cool, moist, pale, ashen or flushed skin. The individual may experience a headache, nausea, dizziness, weakness and/or exhaustion.

How to treat: Move this person to a cool environment with circulating air. Remove as much clothing as possible, apply cold wet cloth/towels and fan or mist the individual with water. If conscious, provide the individual with cold drinks that contain electrolytes, milk or water. The Red Cross recommends 4 ounces of fluid every 15 minutes

If he or she’s condition worsens, refuses water, changes consciousness or vomits: call 911

Heat Stroke

Why: Heat stroke is a life-threatening condition, caused by ignoring signs of heat exhaustion. The body systems are fully overwhelmed and stop functioning.

What happens: Look for red skin, dry or moist. The person changes consciousness, may have a rapid, weak pulse or rapid shallow breathing. He or she may be confused, vomiting or even experience seizures.

How to treat: Call 911 immediately. In the meantime, rapidly cool the body by immersing completely in cold water up to one’s neck or douse or spray the person with cold water. Press ice-water soaked towels over the body while quickly rotating the towels. Cover them with bags of ice. If there is no way to read one’s temperature, apply these methods for 20 minutes.

For more information visit the Red Cross page on treating heat-related illnesses.

Among heat exhaustion, Bonnaroo has an impressive website outlining safety related to alcohol, drugs, food, sexual assault prevention and so much more.

 

 

FINALLY: INDEPENDENT VENUE WEEK HITS THE U.S.

 
shutterstock_654974470.jpg
 

FINALLY: INDEPENDENT VENUE WEEK HITS THE U.S.

WEDNESDAY // MAY 9, 2018

We’ve focused a little bit on the rights of independent music venues in both the U.K. and the U.S. We talked about the UK’s Music Venue Trust (MVT) Venues Day at the Ministry of Sound in London and the strategies executed to recover from the 35% loss of small music venues between 2007 and 2015.

More recently, we discussed the outstanding “Fightback: Grassroots Promoter” $140,000 initiative MVT and the UK’s Music Planet Live created to support aspiring female music promoters hoping to merge into the industry.

Now, after four years of applauding the focus certain groups in the UK have taken on small venue appreciation, the U.S. will follow suit beginning this summer, Billboard reported on Tuesday.

Independent Venue Week’s founder, Sybil Bell, has partnered with the New York-based music marketing firm, Marauder, for its U.S. debut July 9-15.

Which venues will Independent Venue Week highlight? Marauder’s managing partner Rev. Moose says the week plans to spotlight the venues local artists utilize to build their careers.   

One venue on the list includes The Echo in Los Angeles, California, located on the historic Sunset Boulevard. You’ll find a wide range of musical acts performing here such as indie, country, dance, soul and more.

The Echo opened in 2001 and many know The Echo as the upstairs section of the bigger and separate admission club, the Echoplex, which opened five years later. Their specialty? Free Monday night Music, which happened to push The Airborne Toxic Event, War Paint, Active Child, Foster the People and more into the limelight.

Another venue set on its July 13 date and band Western Medication is located in no other but Nashville, Tennessee - also known as Music City. Independent Venue Week chose Nashville’s Mercy Lounge / The High Watt.

The Mercy Lounge opened in January 2003 on the historic century-old Cannery Row as a second-story music venue home to the “best in burgeoning buzz-bands and renowned national talents,” according to their website. The 500-capacity venue has featured John Fogerty, Katy Perry, Snoop Dogg and The White Stripes to name a few.

The following participating venues are listed below. More are soon to be announced, along with the rest of the lineup!

  • Austin, TX – Hotel Vegas – Show details to be announced
  • Boston, MA – The Middle East – Show details to be announced
  • Chicago, IL – Schubas Tavern – Show details to be announced
  • Cleveland, OH – Beachland Ballroom and Tavern – Show details to be announced
  • Dallas, TX – Deep Ellum Art Co – July 11, LEV
  • Durham, NC – Motorco Music Hall – Show details to be announced
  • Los Angeles, CA – The Echo – Show details to be announced
  • Minneapolis, MN – First Avenue – Show details to be announced
  • Nashville, TN – Mercy Lounge/The High Watt – Friday, July 13, Western Medication – Tickets
  • New York, NY – Pianos – Thursday, July 12, Lineup to be announced
  • Philadelphia, PA – World Cafe Live – Show details to be announced
  • Pittsburgh, PA – Mr. Smalls Theatre – Friday, July 13, The Lone Bellow – Tickets
  • Seattle, WA – The Crocodile – Show details to be announced
  • Washington, DC – 9:30 Club – Sunday, July 15, The Get Up Kids – Tickets

These venues, Eventbrite and Songtrust are all teaming up to sponsor the first year in the U.S. On its website, President of Eventbrite’s music division and Ticketfly co-founder Andrew Dreskin describes his excitement in supporting an initiative that supports live music, local venues and promoters.

Rev. Moose is excited to watch the same successful outcome unfold for Independent Venue Week experienced in the UK here in the U.S.

You can also view photos and details surrounding each venue here.  

WHEN SEVERE WEATHER THREATENS INDOOR STADIUMS

  (Image via  Yahoo Canada Sports )

WHEN SEVERE WEATHER THREATENS INDOOR STADIUMS

WEDNESDAY // APRIL 25, 2018

Indoor venues are meant to eliminate concerns about weather conditions having impact on any event. Right?

However, last week the major northeastern spring blizzards tested this belief when ice chunks impaled the roof of the Rogers Centre in Toronto, Canada. This incident actually caused the Blue Jays and Kansas City Royals to postpone their major league baseball game after ice and insulation falling from the CN Tower literally crashed onto the field, Pollstar reported.

Just how bad was the damage? According to Andrew Miller, the Blue Jays’ executive vice president of business operations, the ice tore a 3’x5’ hole in the PVC roof over right field which sent the ice and pieces of insulation onto the turf, Pollstar reported.

In fact, this marks the very first time ice has hit the steel deck supporting the roof of the Rogers Centre and should be thankful the damage didn’t cause a “progressive collapse,” CTV News reported.

Furthermore, the Rogers Centre actually had the first retractable stadium roof in North America, back when it opened in 1989. The original structural engineer, Michael Allen, told CTV News the hole was actually relatively minor and that they actually ran computer modeling of a scenario where something falling from the sky would hit the roof. Allen and his team concluded that even a 9-meter diameter hole through a critical part of the roof would still deem the roof safe.

In regards to sports and events, this was the first weather-related postponement at this venue since 2001, when two panels of the stadium’s moving roof collided.

Another effect of the major northeastern spring blizzard occurred on Saturday, April 14. Heavy rains caused the Air Canada Centre to leak during Game 1, but thankfully only had a short delay, Larry Brown Sports reported.

 

On January 8, 2018, a leak went through the roof of the Mercedes-Benz Stadium about two hours before scheduled kickoff at the national Championship game. College football reporter Jeff Sentell tweeted that the location of the drip occurred around the 25-yard line between the hashes.”

Other users offered their input about the stadium leakage, such as CFB writer/analyst Barrett Sallee below:

 

So what does it take for a venue to be perfectly constructed against these kinds of conditions? Just eight days before Minneapolis’s U.S. Bank Stadium - home to Super Bowl 52 - first opened in July 2016, “extreme weather caused some zinc panels on the exterior of the building to partially disengage,” SB Nation reported.

While the panels did not need replacing, they sure could cause leaks during a snowstorm. That is until about five months later, severe winds ripped a panel off of the stadium, resulting in the installation of 4,000 fasteners - a project that took ten months to complete.

So the answer to a perfect venue that can withstand severe weather such as Minneapolis could be months of repairs, renovations and about $1.1 billion. Go figure!  

As for the Rogers Centre? Repairs to the hole were said to have begun the same week, as you can see in the below video of fearless repairmen.

Falling ice eventually forced the cancellation of Monday night's baseball game Become a weather junkie -- SUBSCRIBE NOW Follow us on Twitter ► https://twitter.com/weathernetwork Like us on Facebook ►https://facebook.com/theweathernetworkCAN/ Follow us on Instagram ► https://instagram.com/weathernetwork/ Weather Network approved!

 

 

HOW TO RESPOND TO FIRE-RELATED INCIDENTS

  (screenshot via   YouTube )

(screenshot via YouTube)

HOW TO RESPOND TO FIRE-RELATED INCIDENTS

WEDNESDAY // APRIL 18, 2018

Through all the Coachella Festival madness, you may not have heard about the Coachella fire that sparked about six miles from the Empire Polo Fields shortly after Beyonce’s performance Saturday evening.

“Dry vegetation helped fuel the fire, which was first reported around 4:30 a.m. Sunday near the 46600 block of Tyler Street,” KSEQ reported.

Firefighters contained the Tyler Fire by 2:45 p.m. on Sunday after 15 acres of land had burned and caused downed power lines. Thankfully nobody was injured and no damage to any structures occurred.

 

According to the Riverside County Fire Department, humans have caused the fire and the investigation is still ongoing.

Coachella Music Festival had luck on their side with the fire having zero impact on the major outdoor event and its festival goers’ safety.   

This does, however, bring an important topic front and center. How do we properly respond to fire-related incidents during an outdoor event, not just Coachella?

In an event where a fire were to occur on stage during load-in, setup, or load-out, does your crew know what proper actions to take and when?    

The Event Safety Alliance discussed this topic in the past based on the knowledge of fire experts, where we outlined below.

Do we fight the fire or evacuate? The fire experts told the ESA most cases are best to evacuate, since seemingly manageable fires may quickly grow too large to contain without the experts and proper equipment.

Two rule of thumbs:

  1. If the fire is bigger than you, get out as quickly as possible while collecting as many people with you and urging others to avoid the area. Make sure somebody called 911.

  2. If the fire is smaller than you, alert everyone to evacuate and find the nearest fire extinguisher. If you prevail, follow the first step above.

The ESA outlines some considerations in attempting to extinguish a fire, found on the ESA’s blog post, listed below:

  • Know the location of each fire extinguisher in your workspace and have been properly trained in its use. Likewise, ensure that the extinguisher is appropriate for the type of fire you are fighting

  • It is best to have a partner when fighting a fire. While one of you is operating the extinguisher, the other can remain focused on the “big picture” and stay in a position to determine if your efforts are diminishing the size of the fire. If the fire is not immediately getting smaller or you doubt whether you are having a significant effect, leave.

  • While fighting a small fire, always do so from a position between the fire and an accessible exit. Keep your back to the exit in case you must leave quickly. If in doubt, get out. If anything concerns you about your safety, exit immediately and help others do the same. Let properly equipped fire fighters extinguish the fire.

  • Do not attempt to move burning materials, especially towards occupied areas (such as the audience). While separating materials may seem like an effective way to prevent a fire from increasing in size, you risk injury and spreading the fire.

  • ALWAYS remove power (shut off electric) BEFORE fighting a fire involving electrical equipment. Electricity can be far more hazardous to those fighting the fire than the fire itself. If you are unable to remove power to electrical equipment, you should not attempt to extinguish the fire yourself. Wait until the equipment is de-energized to fight the fire.

  • The smoke from burning synthetic textiles (e.g., curtains, clothing, etc.)–and many other synthetic materials such as props, instruments, and furniture–can be highly toxic. (http://fashionbi.com/newspaper/the-health-risks-of-toxic-fibers-and-fabrics). Similarly, the extinguishing agent (powder) from dry chemical and dry powder extinguishers can produce a type of “smoke” that can be irritating and cause respiratory problems for those exposed to it. All people should be evacuated from any smoke-filled area, whether the smoke is from the fire or the fire extinguisher.

  • Assign someone to meet emergency responders at the street (or wherever they will arrive) and show them exactly how to access the fire area. Also, have someone available to them who knows the electrical system well. These two actions can take minutes off of how long it takes to extinguish a fire and are wildly helpful to emergency responders.

The ESA concludes by telling us the best protection against a fire is through prevention, but knowing what to do makes all the difference.

PROTECT YOUR GEAR FROM THEFT

cf25bf9ab04d37e66cad6f91b30f4878 (1).jpg

PROTECT YOUR GEAR FROM THEFT

THURSDAY // APRIL 12, 2018

On Friday, March 30, 2018, a thief stole the instruments of Bruce Springsteen’s E Street Band guitarist, Nils Lofgren, prior to his show in Dallas, Texas. Four guitars, harps, tools and other equipment were among the items stolen from the band’s van parked at the Holiday Inn Express, FOX4Dallas reported.

Lofgren felt devastated from losing many sentimental guitars brought with him on tours around the world over the time span of 50 years and 6,000 shows. Despite the loss, Lofgren reassured fans the great show would go on, as a professional musician would be expected to do.

That same night, the guitarist tweeted, “I’m devastated by this robbery. These are my first shows out after a very difficult year. Please consider a retweet. Alas, the show must go on. @KesslerTheater it won’t be the show I was planning on. However I do plan on taking the roof off.”

Lofgren was able to continue the show by borrowing and renting what he needed to make it happen.

Lofgren told FOX4Dallas the thief broke into the van, put the equipment into his trunk and drove off. Thanks to surveillance video, police recovered Lofgren’s guitars the following Monday, and an arrest was made.  

What if this happened to you? And more importantly, what if you didn’t have the resources to have the show go on?

Musicians, performers, venue employees, drivers, touring crew, tech crew, stagehands, and just about any other occupation in the live entertainment industry are subject to losing the precious gear that pay the bills - if they don’t take the right precautions.

How the perpetrator broke has yet to be announced. The investigation of the break-in is still underway, but here are some helpful tips you should consider, provided by gigging musician and deputy sheriff, Jerry Cress, on Disc Makers Blog.

First thing’s first: Document the Sale & Insure Your Gear

If you buy equipment from a private seller, you are urged to have the original owner / private seller, provide documentation of the sale, i.e. “On this date (date), I sold (equipment), serial #_, to (your name) for the amount of (price).”

Inspect your home and car insurance policies in detail. Spend the money to receive instrument insurance.

Keep a record of every single piece of equipment in your possession.

Lock your doors

It might seem like the obvious action, but in the smallest moment you are away from your car is when this type of thief succeeds. Running in the gas station to pay in cash? Lock your car. Forgot your wallet inside? Lock your car. Running down the hotel lobby for some ice? Lock your door! Thieves are constantly on the lookout for anybody who lets their guard down, even for a split second.

Reported recently in Simi Valley, California, is news about gas station “slider thefts” who essentially will slide up to a person’s car out of sight while he or she is getting gas and snatch belongings before quickly escaping the scene.

You can see footage of this happening below:

 

Imagine filling up the tank of your touring van holding thousands of dollars of gear, only to turn around to an empty backseat. So, moral of this lesson is to lock your doors at all time, even if you’re just getting gas.

Keep a clean car and cover your windows

Don’t leave your gear in a vehicle unless you absolutely have to. As soon as you’re able to unload your gear, do so. Leaving important gear in your car on display is comparable to window shopping for a thief. Don’t tempt them. Otherwise, it may be a great idea to invest in some curtains to hide the gear you have inside.

Stay out of the dark

Avoid parking your vehicle holding gear in a back, dark lot of your gig location or hotel. Park in an area with lights, and as close to your gig venue as you can possibly get. Check on your vehicle every so often.

Work as a team

This step may remind you of being in an airport, to never leave your bags unattended. The same goes for loading in and out. In an instant, your unattended equipment can be snatched while you’re loading something else in or out. Have someone in your crew watch the rest of your stuff if you’re preoccupied with something else, whatever that may be.

Rethink your rehearsal space

How does everyone know where the neighborhood band is? They can hear ‘em. That being known, everyone then is aware of the gear inside that house in that garage. The noise complaints and cops outside the house addressing those complaints sure don’t go unnoticed, especially to a thief curious as to what’s inside.

The article also addresses the issue with garage break-ins, and the ease most garage doors have with break-ins built for emergencies. The author suggests investing in good locks or deadbolts and to cover the windows. He further suggests not storing gear in the garage is the surefire way to prevent any of the above.

Invest in lights and alarm systems

Outside light sensors usually shoo a burglar away. Also invest in an alarm system that will notify you right away if there is a breach.

THE FEMALE PROMOTER

image-1.jpg

THE FEMALE PROMOTER

THURSDAY // MARCH 15, 2018

With the month of March dedicated to Women’s History, it seems only fitting to apply the same recognition and appreciation of women thriving in our live entertainment industry. Women have been working hard to represent in all sectors of the live entertainment industry.

Looking at a songwriters and producers study by USC Annenberg Inclusion Initiative and Professor Stacy L. Smith titled, “Inclusion in the Recording Studio?” female artists only made up 22.4 percent of the content creators responsible for the 600 most popular songs from 2012 to 2017. Furthermore, 2017 was its lowest, coming to 16.8 percent of female representation on the charts.  

Observing female producers and songwriters over the same six year time frame and 600 songs, female writers only came out to 12.3 percent. The most shocking? Only 2 percent of the producers were female. That’s one female for every 49 male producers.

What conspires from this data? Two things: Recognizing these facts and making a lasting change. Smith noted, “this is another example of what we see across the ecosystem of entertainment: Women are pushed to the margins or excluded from the creative process,” reported USC News. What to change? Both female and male industry professionals must come together and “bring new voices and different perspectives,” Smith said.

Although there is currently a lack of research among female live music promoters, the several barriers young women face in the promoting sector is no secret to the industry. These barriers include not knowing who to talk to, the fear of risk-taking, how to get the best deal and/or how to make the connections they need, Music Venue Trust reported.  

On International Women’s Day, the UK’s Music Planet Live (MPL) and Music Venue Trust (MVT) announced a major partnership and initiative to uplift young, hopeful female promoters into the industry while revitalizing grassroots music venues. Coined with the name Fightback: Grassroots Promoter, this $140,000 intervention will support its action to recruit 100 young women to put on 100 shows at 100 venues.

“There’s not enough female promoters working in the grassroots music venues, and we’re going to change that,” Beverley Whitrick of MVT said.

MVT will provide a support package of which includes the following;

  • A Gig-In-A-Box: How to book, manage & promote a show
  • Support from local Grassroots Music Venue and music industry professional mentors
  • Your own local event; in turn, your show profits will directly benefit venues in hopes to stay open

While providing an awesome opportunity for women to excel in the promoting sector, Music Venue Trust continues its mission to preserve Grassroots Music Venues, responsible for much of the iconic artists who utilized these local, British venues as a platform to musical success over the past 40 years.

These venues made it possible for artists such as The Beatles, The Clash, Kate Bush, Dire Straits and Radiohead to get recognized, and ultimately given the opportunity to share their treasured music with the world, MVT states on its website. In fact, without these venues we may not ever find another Adele or Ed Sheeran, both amazing artists who give grassroots venues current and relevant value they truly stand for.

In order to revamp the grassroots scene, harnessing a hardworking, new generation of female promoters will strengthen the music community as a whole; Music venues, aspiring artists and new promoters will all thrive immensely. Founded in 2017, this is exactly what Music Planet Live aims to achieve. For this initiative, MPL aims to provide the opportunity for promoters by removing the financial risks, pay the artists and venues alike, Richard Taylor of MPL said.  

For more details regarding Fightback Grassroots Promoter, read the full announcement here: Exciting new initiative from Music Planet Live and Music Venue Trust

For more information on how to apply to Fightback Grassroots Promoter, visit www.musicplanetlive.com to create an account, then email Music Venue Trust at [email protected] for more details.

 

WHY SPECIALIZED PIT SECURITY IS CRUCIAL

Crowd_surf_Green_Day.jpg

WHY PIT SPECIALIZED PIT SECURITY IS CRUCIAL

MONDAY // FEBRUARY 26, 2018

If you have not seen the bizarre video from earlier this month of the over excited fan climbing onto Keisha Cole’s stage to only get physically thrown off by security - well, you should. Here it is below:

 
 

In the video, the man is seen hopping the barricade to join Cole on stage and appears to try and grab the microphone from her. It didn’t take long before security grabbed the man who didn’t seem to comply with the bouncer’s orders before throwing him off of the stage.

Although no injuries were reported, the fall looks quite painful. How did this man manage to get past security? How did he manage to climb the barricade and do so without anyone noticing in time?

The video seems to show pit security fail to react in time to the over zealous fan. Sometimes the consequences won’t stop these types of fans from committing this act. For one, an individual who commits this crime may get arrested, charged with a misdemeanor, punishable up to 93 days in jail and fined as much as $500, Thomas Hardesty, Director of Security & Traffic Management for Palace Sports Entertainment told Yahoo! Entertainment.

This man may have suffered minor injuries, but others are not so lucky. In fact, a fan actually died two weeks after a 2010 Ted Nugent show after the bass player kicked the adoring fan in the head after he snuck on stage, Yahoo! Entertainment reported.

The event security, but perhaps they weren’t specialized pit security personnel. GPS Security outlined five reasons why every event needs to establish specialized pit security for us to elaborate on in response to the recent event.   

1. Lifting People Properly: Especially after this man fell (after security failed to catch him), lifting individuals from a dense crowd requires proper training and care. With the potential for injury of both the lifter and the individual, specialized pit crews are necessary since they possess the sufficient skills to do so.

2. Performers Safety / Fan Safety: When a venue hires a specialized pit crew, the performer should not be subject to any threats from the crowd. Even if the performer decides to descend to the crowd for interaction, the specialized pit crew upholds the performer’s safety. Although the intentions of the over excited fan may not be malicious, an uncontrolled fan on stage opens many doors for a negative conclusion - which brings us to another point we decided is just as important: Fan Safety.

Just like the video, security aggressively shoved the fan onto the floor. What if the fan had fallen head first or trampled on following the fall? Having a surprise fan jump on stage isn’t the first thought on the performer’s mind during their gig. Just as we mentioned before, a fan had died because of the bass player’s reaction.  

3. Safety of Crew: When a crew is in place, they not only look out for the performers/fans, but also each other. In a case where one security personnel acts alone, he or she may not have the proper backup if a fan becomes too much for one person to handle alone. Lifting and escorting an individual should be done in groups of three, eliminating the difficulty and danger of the crew member and the individual. 

4. They See Everything: From the video, it is very difficult to tell where the security’s eyes are focused on at the time of the barricade hop. An experienced pit crew knows how to constantly scan the crowd for threats while interacting casually. In addition, some pit crews may have water to keep the pit fans hydrated.

5. Team Work = Key to Good Functioning: An experienced pit crew will have a plan of action for every circumstance. The article explains if one pit crew member notices an issue, he or she will know the proper way to inform the others and seamlessly handle the situation together.

VENUES RIGHTS MATTER: Los Angeles Small Music Venue Roundup

VENUES RIGHTS MATTER: Los Angeles Small Music Venue Roundup

Monday // October 16, 2017

On the surface, we connect with the beat, the melody, the vocals. Surely there are more reasons individuals willingly gather in one place and break all personal space barriers in hopes of getting closer to the stage.

Recall the best concert experience that tops all the rest. Besides the music sounding top-notch, what else contributed to the unforgettable night?

Perhaps it was singing and dancing with best friends. Maybe it was an intimate connection with your significant other. The artist touched your hand, or you swore they held eye contact with you. Right. Or, maybe it’s the night you fell in love.

The gist of it is, live music connects humans in countless ways. But this can’t be done without a space. Venues are the museum to a work of art, the restaurant to a promising chef’s curated cuisine, the showroom to a designer’s new fashion line. Without them, it’s impossible to showcase the creative expression that ultimately makes our home unique.       

Not only do music venues hold a special place in the hearts of musicians, music lovers and venue owners themselves, but they stand as a historical pieces of treasure that reflect the city’s pop culture. The thought of our music venues being stripped from the local history is unfathomable to many.

Tomorrow on October 17, 2017 marks the UK’s Music Venue Trust (MVT) Venues Day at the Ministry of Sound in London. Unfortunately, London alone has lost 35 percent of its small venues between 2007 and 2015 due to tough licensing scrutiny, planning, rising rent cost and other grievances.

On the website, MVT’s stated goal of Venue’s Day is to raise awareness of venues’ rights, with this year focusing on the “synergy between artists and grassroots music venues.”  

Toronto has seen seven venues disappear only three months into 2017, according to The National Post. Similar to London, Canada’s live music industry created Music Canada Live to build awareness of the country's venues closing.

Besides property development, one point may be that millennial fans may not share the same passion for seeing small, one-act concerts. With the rapid growth of music festivals, attendees literally create lists upon lists of the acts they wish to see all in one weekend. These festivals are so popular, that according to the 2016 Nielsen’s Audience Insights Report on Music Festivals, 32 million people attend at least one music festival each year.

This audience also frequently uses Spotify or other streaming services to browse new artists rather than check out a band they’ve never heard about play in a small venue. Live music discovery for them often occurs at these music festivals, such as San Francisco’s indie Noise Pop festival.

When independent artists receive this opportunity, they get one chance to wow an already-present audience, potentially gain exposure and a fanbase. In turn, this makes it very hard for those smaller, independent venues to survive.

According to The Rolling Stone 2010 piece “Summer Festivals Force Bands to Skip Local Venues,” the Artist Exclusivity Clause in America dictates where festival acts can or cannot play in relation to the festival’s location.

For example, if Twenty One Pilots are set to perform at Coachella this year, the band can’t play anywhere near the Polo Fields during a 7-month time frame before the festival.

LA’s Spaceland and The Echo talent buyer Elizabeth Garo told The Rolling Stone that April is the toughest month to book bands since the artists are committed to playing at Coachella or are waiting to hear back from them.

So do we blame the millennials? Music festivals? Property developers? Streaming music services? Whatever the reason may be, large and small local venues alike need to stay on top of any threats, major or minor, that could impose on venue survival. You can read more about these steps in "How the Music Venue Business Needs to Change in 2017" on Event Brite.

One of them is building awareness, like MVT actively accomplishes in the UK. Here is a roundup of some of Los Angeles’ best small music venues, that we as citizens and a city, hold the responsibility of ensuring the survival of our live music culture.

We must remind individuals of their best concert ever, or unforgettable night they saw the Rolling Stones or Foo Fighters before making it big. So, we will do just that. Here is a roundup of LA’s small music venues we believe are worth mentioning:


The Smell

  • Capacity: 130
  • Ages: All ages
  • Location: 247 S Main St., Los Angeles
  • Upcoming events: The Red Pears/Jurassic Shark/Kicked Off The Streets/The Ok Shack (10/20), No Parents/FEELS/DUMB F**** (10/21)

With a capacity of 130, this tiny venue means a whole lot to its regular rock/punk fans with only one sole purpose in mind: the music. This venue holds true to DIY principles. It’s an all-ages, alcohol-free, and the cover charge is a mere $5. In June 2016, the owner received a demolition notice from the building’s landlord, the L&R Group of Companies, the LA Times reported last year. Young fans and artists actually gathered for a benefit where 36 bands performed to help save The Smell, bringing in $15,000, and after an online-benefit, raised a total of $24,000. The support the venue received a year ago just goes on to show how much the independent music scene means for up-and-coming artists. In fact, indie pop duo Matt & Kim played at The Smell when the duo first started out. In the Daily Bruin, Matt Johnson of the duo described his closeness with the city of Los Angeles and recalled The Smell having a warehouse vibe, not being nice, but a great venue nonetheless.

 

The Mint

  • Capacity: 165
  • Ages: Mostly 21+
  • Location: 6010 West Pico Blvd., Los Angeles
  • Upcoming Events: Banda Magda/Nasi Nassiri/Yolanda Johnson/WOLF CAT (10/20), The Withers/FOE/Modern Haze/Trade Heroes (10/21)

This local landmark was established in 1937 known to many breakout musicians including Stevie Wonder, Willie Dixon, Natalie Cole, Ray Charles and more. Its homey vibe includes Johnny Cash paintings, display cases of Hollywood history, and a ceiling covered with vinyl records. Other notable artists who have graced this stage before reaching fame include the Wallflowers, Ben Harper and Lady Antebellum. Aside from live music, The Mint offers tapas style food and a full bar.

 

Hotel Cafe

  • Capacity:165
  • Ages: 21+
  • Location: 1623 N Cahuenga Blvd., Los Angeles
  • Upcoming Events: Loren North/Western Scene/The Teskey Brothers (10/17), King Leg/Njomza/Jillette Johnson/Dylan Gardner (10/18)

Hotel Cafe opened in 2000 as a space for young artists moving into the spotlight. Such acts include Katy Perry, Mumford & Suns, Sia, Ed Sheeran and Lana Del Rey, according to the LA Times. Sonicbids says Hotel Cafe is a singer-songwriter’s dream venue, and perhaps this is because widely known acts such as John Mayer and Chris Martin continue to play and share the stage with rising artists within an intimate space.

 

The Satellite

  • Capacity: 260
  • Ages: 21+
  • Location: 1717 Silver Lake Blvd., Los Angeles
  • Upcoming Events: Babe Parade Love and a .38 Lanterns (10/16 FREE show), Benyaro/The Flusters/Bradford Hunter Wrap/Your Future Lovers (10/17)

If you’re looking to hear the next up-and-coming rock/indie band without breaking the bank, look no further. This hipster music venue sits in the heart of Silver Lake and features new rock bands every night of the week. Formerly known as Spaceland, this venue is the home to many famous artists who were just starting out, including the Foo Fighters, Foster the People, Local Natives, Silversun Pickups and Beck. Besides rock, the venue experiments with other creative live music sets, such as indie-electronic groups perfect for the dance floor. On Mondays, The Satellite offers no cover charge, so make sure to show up early to score a table for the night.

 

Echoplex

  • Capacity: 350
  • Ages: 18+
  • Location: 1822 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles
  • Upcoming Events: The Babe Rainbow (10/17), Dub Club (10/18), Nick Hakim (10/19), Tei Shi (10/20), & Wolves In The Throne (10/21)

In 2006, Spaceland Presents began operating The Echoplex, home to Echo Park neighborhood. The Echoplex sits below The Echo, and  is only accessible through an alley and down a flight of stairs. Like The Satellite, this venue aims to give up-and-coming artists exposure. Both the Echo and Echoplex have launched independent artists in the spotlight such as The Airborne Toxic Event and War Paint. In addition, the Rolling Stones, Nine Inch Nails, Green Day , Incubus, LCD Systems, Kendrick Lamar and several more notable artists have played here.      

 

Troubadour

  • Capacity: 500
  • Ages: All ages
  • Location: 9081 Santa Monica Blvd., Los Angeles
  • Upcoming Events: Sarah Jarosz (10/17), Pigeons Playing Ping Pong (10/21)

This gem opened in 1957 as a folk club before a rock venue, and contains many defining moments in music history. Several iconic artists began at this intimate venue, including Elton John, The Eagles, Joni Mitchell, Love, Cheech and Chong, Buffalo Springfield, Billy Joel, The Byrds and more. A common word used to describe small venues is intimate. Pair that with the most excellent sound system and you'll get Troubadour. 

 

Whiskey a Go Go

  • Capacity: 500
  • Ages: All ages
  • Location: 8901 Sunset Blvd., West Hollywood
  • Upcoming Events: Social Repose/Hotel Books/Funeral Portrait (10/16), Ultimate Jam Night (10/17), Tony Macalpine + Felix Martin/Incipience/Power Tribe (10/18)

Another notable rock club on the Sunset Strip opened in 1964 and has also launched world renowned artists into the limelight such as Johnny Rivers, the Doors, and more. According to LA Weekly, the venue nowadays books new bands as well as largely known artists from time to time. Although Whisky A Go Go may not boast its go-go dancing cages from older times, the venue consists of a dance floor, balcony, two full bars and most importantly, an impressive PA.

 

The Roxy Theatre

  • Capacity: 500
  • Ages: All ages
  • Location: 9009 West Sunset Blvd., West Hollywood
  • Upcoming Events: My American Heart (10/19), Private Island (10/20), Shed Seven/Lil Xan (10/21)

The Roxy Theatre is another independently operated venue with Goldenvoice in charge of booking shows. In 1973, Lou Adler, Elmer Valentine and original partners David Geffen, Elliot Roberts and Peter Ashen opened the theatre in response to venue mistreatment of artists. In hopes to make artists feel comfortable, Starting out as venue showing mostly comedians, The Roxy has grown into both a place for aspiring and well-known artists alike. Notable artists who are connected to this venue include John Lennon, Alice Cooper, Neil Young, and the Ramone’s first California gig occurred here in 1976. A venue with history, high quality sound and intimacy, guests should arrive early to secure a good spot.     

 

El Rey Theatre

  • Capacity: 771
  • Ages: All ages
  • Location: 5515 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles
  • Upcoming Events: Aquilo (10/16), JR JR (10/19), YehMe2 (10/20), & Moses Sumney (10/21)

Another theatre operated by Goldenvoice, El Rey Theatre opened in 1936 as a movie house until it became a live music venue in 1994. According to its website, the El Rey is a registered Historic-Cultural Monument with its magnificent staircases, art deco lobby, facade, VIP balcony lounge and stage positioned in the grand ballroom.

The Fonda Theatre

  • Capacity: 1,200
  • Ages: All ages
  • Location: 6126 Hollywood Blvd., Los Angeles
  • Upcoming Events: Tash Sultana (10/20), Dinosaur Jr. (10/21), Mitski (10/22), Sheryl Crow (10/23), & Yeah Yeah Yeahs (10/25)

The Fonda was originally built as a 1920’s venue called Carter De Haven’s Music Box, and was known as The Henry Fonda Theatre and The Music Box. Reopened in 2012 and currently operated by Goldenvoice, this classic venue contains a theatrical performance room and a projection screen on the rooftop bar.

 

The Wiltern

  • Capacity: 1,850
  • Ages: 5+ ; 18+ for Insomniac events
  • Location: 3790 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles
  • Upcoming Events: In This Moment (10/18), Snakehips (10/20), CRYSTAL CASTLES (10/21), & HIM (10/24)

Live Nation operates The Wiltern, designed in 1931 as the Warner Brothers Western Theater boasting its original, elegant design including murals stretching to its ceilings and intricate tile work, true to its time. On two separate occasions, locals rescued demolition notices in the late 1970s, and creating a first victory for the Los Angeles Conservancy in protecting architectural monuments.