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HOW TO RESPOND TO FIRE-RELATED INCIDENTS

  (screenshot via   YouTube )

(screenshot via YouTube)

HOW TO RESPOND TO FIRE-RELATED INCIDENTS

WEDNESDAY // APRIL 18, 2018

Through all the Coachella Festival madness, you may not have heard about the Coachella fire that sparked about six miles from the Empire Polo Fields shortly after Beyonce’s performance Saturday evening.

“Dry vegetation helped fuel the fire, which was first reported around 4:30 a.m. Sunday near the 46600 block of Tyler Street,” KSEQ reported.

Firefighters contained the Tyler Fire by 2:45 p.m. on Sunday after 15 acres of land had burned and caused downed power lines. Thankfully nobody was injured and no damage to any structures occurred.

 

According to the Riverside County Fire Department, humans have caused the fire and the investigation is still ongoing.

Coachella Music Festival had luck on their side with the fire having zero impact on the major outdoor event and its festival goers’ safety.   

This does, however, bring an important topic front and center. How do we properly respond to fire-related incidents during an outdoor event, not just Coachella?

In an event where a fire were to occur on stage during load-in, setup, or load-out, does your crew know what proper actions to take and when?    

The Event Safety Alliance discussed this topic in the past based on the knowledge of fire experts, where we outlined below.

Do we fight the fire or evacuate? The fire experts told the ESA most cases are best to evacuate, since seemingly manageable fires may quickly grow too large to contain without the experts and proper equipment.

Two rule of thumbs:

  1. If the fire is bigger than you, get out as quickly as possible while collecting as many people with you and urging others to avoid the area. Make sure somebody called 911.

  2. If the fire is smaller than you, alert everyone to evacuate and find the nearest fire extinguisher. If you prevail, follow the first step above.

The ESA outlines some considerations in attempting to extinguish a fire, found on the ESA’s blog post, listed below:

  • Know the location of each fire extinguisher in your workspace and have been properly trained in its use. Likewise, ensure that the extinguisher is appropriate for the type of fire you are fighting

  • It is best to have a partner when fighting a fire. While one of you is operating the extinguisher, the other can remain focused on the “big picture” and stay in a position to determine if your efforts are diminishing the size of the fire. If the fire is not immediately getting smaller or you doubt whether you are having a significant effect, leave.

  • While fighting a small fire, always do so from a position between the fire and an accessible exit. Keep your back to the exit in case you must leave quickly. If in doubt, get out. If anything concerns you about your safety, exit immediately and help others do the same. Let properly equipped fire fighters extinguish the fire.

  • Do not attempt to move burning materials, especially towards occupied areas (such as the audience). While separating materials may seem like an effective way to prevent a fire from increasing in size, you risk injury and spreading the fire.

  • ALWAYS remove power (shut off electric) BEFORE fighting a fire involving electrical equipment. Electricity can be far more hazardous to those fighting the fire than the fire itself. If you are unable to remove power to electrical equipment, you should not attempt to extinguish the fire yourself. Wait until the equipment is de-energized to fight the fire.

  • The smoke from burning synthetic textiles (e.g., curtains, clothing, etc.)–and many other synthetic materials such as props, instruments, and furniture–can be highly toxic. (http://fashionbi.com/newspaper/the-health-risks-of-toxic-fibers-and-fabrics). Similarly, the extinguishing agent (powder) from dry chemical and dry powder extinguishers can produce a type of “smoke” that can be irritating and cause respiratory problems for those exposed to it. All people should be evacuated from any smoke-filled area, whether the smoke is from the fire or the fire extinguisher.

  • Assign someone to meet emergency responders at the street (or wherever they will arrive) and show them exactly how to access the fire area. Also, have someone available to them who knows the electrical system well. These two actions can take minutes off of how long it takes to extinguish a fire and are wildly helpful to emergency responders.

The ESA concludes by telling us the best protection against a fire is through prevention, but knowing what to do makes all the difference.

HOW TO PREVENT & COPE WITH ANXIETY AT YOUR FESTIVAL GIG

HOW TO PREVENT & COPE WITH ANXIETY AT YOUR FESTIVAL GIG

MONDAY // APRIL 9, 2018

It’s officially festival season. Whether you’re the musician, performer, venue employee, volunteer, security, driver, touring crew, camping operations, tech crew, stagehand, ticketing operations, etc...working at a days-long music festival can throw serious curve balls at your mental health.

Behind-the-scene areas can be just as chaotic as the elements posed to the general public. You’re constantly just trying to do your job, but sometimes the music festival environment can throw you off balance.

Factors include but are not limited to a lack of sleep, working overtime, sensory overload, dehydration, high-stress environment, skipping meals and much more.

More recently than before, an increasing number of countries are finally beginning to put mental health on the same level of importance as physical wellbeing. In an industry already mentally and physically demanding, paying attention to your own wellness often comes second, if not last.

In the days leading up to and during your festival gig, feelings of anxiety are highly common. In fact, anxiety disorders are one of the most common mental illnesses in the United States, with approximately 40 million people affected, according to the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH).

Each individual is widely unique from the next, so each formula will differ in regards to what works and what does not.

That being said, here is our round-up of tips and tricks you may consider to prevent anxiety, to combat anxiety or what to do if you experience a full-blown panic attack during your festival gig.

Prevention: Prepare for the days ahead

You know you’ll be working at Coachella in a few days, so now is the time to prepare yourself both physically and mentally.

It’s kind of like preparing for a marathon minus actually being in the marathon. Physically prepare yourself by feeding your body the right nutrients it needs and getting enough sleep during the nights leading up to the festival.

Your friends and family may have the common misconception about you working behind the scenes of a music festival - meaning, you’ll receive lavish treatment alongside festival acts they dream to see in concert. Sorry to disappoint your loved ones, you remind them the only person there to take care of you is YOU. And besides, most of the festival acts have their own trailers or spaces separate from the backstage crew.

Long story short, you need to be responsible for keeping your physical health in check. Particular circumstances may call for you to stand for longer than normal periods of time, remain in crowded areas (yes, even backstage, especially before/during performances of bigger artists), spend lots of time away from air conditioned rooms or resort to a meal you wouldn’t normally opt for.

If you prepare with lots of sleep and nutritious meals, your body will react stronger to unforeseen situations at the festival. Lack of sleep contributes to both stress and anxiety, so going into the festival with your energy tank full is highly recommended.

Like we’ve said in previous blog posts, the more stressed you are, the less likely you are to sleep and having a bad night’s sleep prior to working at the festival will contribute further to that stress and cause anxiety.

And again, too much caffeine intake and/or smoking cigarettes to combat sleep deprivation and stress, respectively, are both recipes for anxiety.

If you’ve never been to the venue, try and familiarize yourself with it through maps, research or even a Google maps image of the outside. It may seem like the obvious thing to do, but double or triple checking may ease your nerves.

Also noting the locations to exits, entrances, emergency exits and medical tents is both helpful and comforting. Apply this same knowledge to both general public areas and backstage.

Prior to the festival, try to tell yourself and expect that you cannot control everything. Roll with the punches and do your best. If you are doing the absolute best job you can do in your control then you’ll have to settle for it - and be proud!

Feeling Anxious

Of course, there is a big difference between feeling anxious and suffering from an anxiety disorder. Regardless, when facing these feelings, it may be safe to say the individual is experiencing behavioral anxiety, a response to frightening or stressful situations, Life Hacker reported.

There are many theories pertaining to the origin of anxiety and many forms of anxiety disorders. Whether you are one or the other, repetitive feelings of anxiety, strong or mild can have a negative impact on your state of mind during the big event.

Despite all attempts at prevention, you begin to tense up, have an overwhelming sense of awareness of all your surroundings and feel fearful and/or dreadful. This is the definition of anxiety.

But how do you know if you are experiencing a panic attack? Outlined by Anxiety BC, there are 4 Facts you should know about panic attacks:

  1. Panic attacks are simply the body’s fight/flight/freeze response even when there is no real danger present. A physical response may include an increased heart rate.
  2. Although scary and/or uncomfortable, panic attacks are harmless. They are compared to an alarm system within your body, but not designed to cause real harm.
  3. Panic attacks only last about 5-10 minutes, although they may feel as if they last an eternity.
  4. Many times, most people won’t be able to see you experiencing one. Those closest to you will, but for the most part they are internal experiences.

Outlined by the Anxiety And Depression Association of America (ADAA), here are some strategies you can use to decrease the intensity of a panic attack. Anxiety BC urges one to use these techniques NOT to stop a panic attack, but to help you ride it out until it’s over.

  • Take deep breaths; concentrate on inhaling and exhaling slowly through your nose. Not just in the event of a panic attack, but also throughout the day while feeling stressed.
    • Don’t use breathing to stop a panic attack, because it’ll only make it worse. Instead, use breathing techniques to lessen the intensity, Anxiety BC reported.
    • Slowly count to 10 or 20 if necessary

Taking a time out not be possible with your role at the festival, but in any moment you have a team member who can take your place for a small window of 5-10 minutes, getting some fresh air away from the chaos in a comfortable area works wonders.

  • In preparation to the festival, stowing some headphones in your pocket for this situation also helps remove yourself mentally from the chaotic scene
  • Learn some relaxation techniques such as meditation - meditation during a festival, yeah right. This is where headphones and a space to close your eyes for a brief moment can really help.
  • If possible, try some of these Muscle Relaxation techniques. This is more effective if you start practicing these in times not suffering from a panic attack. So in the event you experience one, this technique will be a piece of cake.  

Adopt Realistic Thinking

According to Anxiety BC, what occurs in the mind during a panic attack can be categorized as overestimating or catastrophizing.

  • Overestimating: Picturing the worst outcome (that most likely will not happen) is going to happen, such as having a heart attack due to your panic attack
    • Fight back: These thoughts are NOT facts. You are mistaking a possibility for a probability. Ask yourself how likely this outcome actually is.
  • Catastrophizing: Thinking the worst thing will happen and you won’t be able to deal with it, such as fainting from a panic attack and having others laugh and judge you  
    • Fight back: Ask yourself what’s the worst that can happen when coping with the negative situation. Would it really make a difference in the duration of a year?  

These are just some of the tools one can use to combat a panic attack. Many more involve steps to take at home, away from the festival scene, that will overall help you when you are challenged with a panic attack on the job.

To read more in detail about panic attacks and management strategies you can take during the attack, before and after click here.

Finally, when the festival is all said and done, it is crucial to take at least one day off to regroup. Your hard work, long hours, lack of sleep and/or nutrition probably derailed from its normal, healthy path so it is important to give your body and mind the rest it needs and deserves.

Really try to put down the phone and refrain from checking every single email the day after the festival. Those follow-up emails and thank-yous can very well wait 24 hours.

When you do return to work, this could be the perfect time to open up to your team about how you’re feeling.

If you feel stressed and overwhelmed, chances are your team members feel the same way and a support system is formed.

This could also be a time to speak with teammates and supervisors about what went well and what did not.

Evaluate the situations that caused the most stress by writing them down, discussing them and making a lasting change for future festivals and events.

In turn, encourage your team to open up by asking how they are really feeling and offering a helping hand. According to Conference & Incentive Travel that ranked events industry professionals No.5 on the most stressful jobs, a staggering 38% of individuals do not want to ask for help.

Reassuring your teammates they’re not alone could very well change this percentage and the stigma associated with mental health in our industry.  
 

WHY SPECIALIZED PIT SECURITY IS CRUCIAL

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WHY PIT SPECIALIZED PIT SECURITY IS CRUCIAL

MONDAY // FEBRUARY 26, 2018

If you have not seen the bizarre video from earlier this month of the over excited fan climbing onto Keisha Cole’s stage to only get physically thrown off by security - well, you should. Here it is below:

 
 

In the video, the man is seen hopping the barricade to join Cole on stage and appears to try and grab the microphone from her. It didn’t take long before security grabbed the man who didn’t seem to comply with the bouncer’s orders before throwing him off of the stage.

Although no injuries were reported, the fall looks quite painful. How did this man manage to get past security? How did he manage to climb the barricade and do so without anyone noticing in time?

The video seems to show pit security fail to react in time to the over zealous fan. Sometimes the consequences won’t stop these types of fans from committing this act. For one, an individual who commits this crime may get arrested, charged with a misdemeanor, punishable up to 93 days in jail and fined as much as $500, Thomas Hardesty, Director of Security & Traffic Management for Palace Sports Entertainment told Yahoo! Entertainment.

This man may have suffered minor injuries, but others are not so lucky. In fact, a fan actually died two weeks after a 2010 Ted Nugent show after the bass player kicked the adoring fan in the head after he snuck on stage, Yahoo! Entertainment reported.

The event security, but perhaps they weren’t specialized pit security personnel. GPS Security outlined five reasons why every event needs to establish specialized pit security for us to elaborate on in response to the recent event.   

1. Lifting People Properly: Especially after this man fell (after security failed to catch him), lifting individuals from a dense crowd requires proper training and care. With the potential for injury of both the lifter and the individual, specialized pit crews are necessary since they possess the sufficient skills to do so.

2. Performers Safety / Fan Safety: When a venue hires a specialized pit crew, the performer should not be subject to any threats from the crowd. Even if the performer decides to descend to the crowd for interaction, the specialized pit crew upholds the performer’s safety. Although the intentions of the over excited fan may not be malicious, an uncontrolled fan on stage opens many doors for a negative conclusion - which brings us to another point we decided is just as important: Fan Safety.

Just like the video, security aggressively shoved the fan onto the floor. What if the fan had fallen head first or trampled on following the fall? Having a surprise fan jump on stage isn’t the first thought on the performer’s mind during their gig. Just as we mentioned before, a fan had died because of the bass player’s reaction.  

3. Safety of Crew: When a crew is in place, they not only look out for the performers/fans, but also each other. In a case where one security personnel acts alone, he or she may not have the proper backup if a fan becomes too much for one person to handle alone. Lifting and escorting an individual should be done in groups of three, eliminating the difficulty and danger of the crew member and the individual. 

4. They See Everything: From the video, it is very difficult to tell where the security’s eyes are focused on at the time of the barricade hop. An experienced pit crew knows how to constantly scan the crowd for threats while interacting casually. In addition, some pit crews may have water to keep the pit fans hydrated.

5. Team Work = Key to Good Functioning: An experienced pit crew will have a plan of action for every circumstance. The article explains if one pit crew member notices an issue, he or she will know the proper way to inform the others and seamlessly handle the situation together.

COMMUNICATION IS KEY TO A SUCCESSFUL JOB

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COMMUNICATION IS KEY TO A SUCCESSFUL JOB

THURSDAY // FEBRUARY 15, 2018

The smallest form of miscommunication can result in a total disaster when it comes to the live entertainment industry. On the individual level, you may be the best, organized event professional who notices minuscule details, but if you lack effective communication with other individuals working on the same event, nobody will care about your skills when disaster strikes.

When we read about other event conundrums, never think, “that will never happen to me,” because many times the victim of these disasters will think, “I can't believe this happened to me!”

Pollstar recently published an article about the secret to having a smooth show day, pointing at effective communication from the venue executives over the phone as the key.

The article highlights phone communication eliminates details that may slip through the cracks over email. You can have hundreds of emails back and forth, but someone will most likely miss something.

“Venues need to be sure to communicate with tour managers to give them a heads-up about potential challenges to load-in, such as construction in the area,” the article says. Jerome Crooks, tour manager for Nine Inch Nails, Tool and LCD Soundsystem told Pollstar a venue forgot to tell him a marathon was going through the area, resulting in a two-hour delay to load-in.

Let’s look at the TomorrowWorld 2015 disaster in Chattahoochee Hills, Georgia, for example. The rain showers caused the rural venue to transform into a mud pit, making it impossible for cars to drive to and from the event.

The result? TomorrowWorld’s 120,000 young attendees were faced with 20-mile traffic jams, 5 mile-hikes, lack of food and water, and no shelter during the night, reported Vice.

The venue was totally unprepared for the weather conditions surrounding the event. Nothing was communicated between the festival organizers and venue about creating a back-up plan. People either paid hundreds of dollars to Uber’s surging prices or slept on the side of the road without food and water, the article reported.

With no real effective plan of action, the event actually cancelled its third day for attendees not camping on-site. Lack of planning, coordination and communication concluded the festival’s return accompanied by lawsuits.

What can we do to communicate better?

Event planners revealed their tips to etouches.com on how to prevent issues before and during the big day.

After Text/Email, Follow-Up With a Call: This day and age, most of the communication we participate in on a daily basis is done digitally, via text or email. Possessing important information on an email document or text is necessary and extremely helpful, but there is always the possibility ideas or crucial details get lost in translation. We know this already when it comes to everyday communication with the relationships we have outside of work. Follow-up with a phone call, especially if the email/text includes crucial detail or lengthy information.

In addition, the “you never got my text?” excuse doesn’t fly anymore and no one will believe you, even if you did try to send a text. A simple follow-up phone call does the trick and ensures confidence in the exchange of information.

Interacting/Following Up With Third-Party Vendors: Frequently checking in with both your team and the client is crucial. Waiting for mistakes to surface on their own is detrimental to the event. Checking up on the progress gives a chance to pinpoint any mistakes threatening to the event’s success. In addition, this interaction “builds rapport and creates lasting relationships,” the article said.

Following up with third-party vendors, such as a photographer, caterer, or DJ is crucial to ensure what you may have promised to the client as expected. Failure to communicate with these parties would fall on you no matter what the cause.

Write Efficient Emails: There is no excuse for the 20 typos in your email, we have spell check, people! In addition to spelling, the most important thing is to communicate all the details necessary in one email rather than a series of back and forth emails, resulting in a email chain that scrolls for days. You may be hiding Important information within the chain, impossible to find, resulting in wasted time and potential event disaster.

The takeaway? Keep all lines of communication open. Call frequently, write efficiently and interact with all parties more than once. Doing so will save your event, your reputation and your money.   

THE LAS VEGAS SHOOTING: How Will the Live Music Industry Respond?

  (Photo credit:   Eva Rinaldi  via Flickr)

(Photo credit: Eva Rinaldi via Flickr)

THE LAS VEGAS SHOOTING: How Will the Live Music Industry Respond?

Wednesday // October 4, 2017

“Pray for Paris,” “Pray for Manchester," “Pray for Orlando," and now, “Pray for Las Vegas”. The slogans ring all too familiar, and prior to each event, all unprecedented.

Of course, none of these attacks were linked together in relation to the shooter, motive, nor region.

The Bataclan attack was part of a series of coordinated Paris terrorist attacks on November 13, 2015, where 89 of the 130 killed were attending the Eagles of Death Metal concert.

On May 22, 2016, 22-year old Salman Abedi bombed the outside foyer of an Ariana Grande concert, killing 22 and injuring 116.

The terrorist attack on Pulse Nighclub in Orlando, Florida, hit closer to home for Americans when 29-year old Omar Mateen killed 49 people and injured 58 in the deadliest hate crime against the LGTBQ+ community and deadliest U.S. mass shooting at the time.

The 2017 Las Vegas Strip Shooting, or the Route 91 Harvest country music festival shooting, took Pulse’s spot when 64-year old Stephen Paddock opened fire from the 32nd floor of the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino, overlooking the crowd of 22,000 concertgoers. On October 2, 2017, Paddock fired shots for ten minutes, killing 58 and injuring 530 innocent people.

The only thing that connects these events together are the events themselves. We attend music events to celebrate music, life and loved ones. We put aside about our troubles, disagreements and hardships in our lives for a few hours, or sometimes a few days at a festival, to unite in the form of music.

Live Nation, the same promoter for the Ariana Grande concert where the Manchester attack occurred, has promoted Route 91 Harvest Festival in Las Vegas for four years. On Monday, the company issued a heartfelt statement regarding support to victims and their families following the aftermath of the horrendous tragedy. The statement also thanks first responders and other employees.

The company also states, “And while we are stunned and grieving over this incomprehensible act of violence, we know that this is a moment when we must come together to prevent more tragedies like this from occurring.”

Each of these events then questions the effectiveness of security. How do we secure the inside? How do we secure in the perimeter?

And now, an even more frightening question: How do we secure an aerial attack several football fields away and 32 stories high?

There are two areas to focus on. First, how do we prevent individuals from transporting several boxes of high-power ammunition into an upper-level hotel room? And how do we protect innocent concertgoers on the ground from the external danger? 

Regarding hotel security, none of the hotel employees noticed anything out of the ordinary in Paddock’s hotel room or behavior. In fact, Steven Adelman, vice president of the Event Safety Alliance, said “[Paddock] would have eluded attention anywhere,” CBS reported on Tuesday. He added that the only sure-fire way to prevent weapons entering hotels would require impractical airport-style surveillance.

Mac Segal, head of Hotel and Fixed Site Security Consulting at AS Solution, told USA Today that hotel security would never anticipate this type of attack.

The ESA’s statement on the shooting reads, “Our industry is more united and resolute than ever in the advancement of robust security protocols to ensure the safety of our cherished guests, artists, and crew. However, sometimes there is never enough..we will continue together to advocate for increasingly effective safety measures at events around the globe.”

When something this devastating occurs due to the threat external to the facility, event promoters find it more difficult than ever, if not impossible, to predict or take account for what is going on outside of your facility.

“The venue, Live Nation, and the various promoters are all focused on securing the facility. This threat was external - via the hotel, where they have no jurisdiction or operational control or ability to manipulate the variables around security…” said Chris Robinette, CEO of Prevent Advisors, a security consulting company, Variety reported.  

Therefore, this type of attack calls for large outdoor event organizers to observe event regulation in regards to evacuation procedures and the event location, such as events next to high-rise hotels.

Standing room festival seating easily sparks chaos in response to a disaster such as this.

“There are no aisles, no direction and the crowd density is high. A lot of people are all leaving at once, they can’t find a way out and there is no one to give direction,” said Paul Wertheimer, head of Crowd Management Strategies, to USA Today.

Segal added the lack of pre recorded announcement at Route 91 Festival accounted for much of the confusion for the attendees in regards to some kind of direction on where to evacuate.  

As for events adjacent to high-rise buildings and hotels, security professionals and promoters suggested expanding the perimeter around these types of targets, the New York Times reported on Tuesday. But, Adelman adds, “Do you not hold festivals near hills or tall trees?”

All of these questions are seemingly becoming the new norm for security professionals, event venues and event promoters. Robinette urges that working with law enforcement officials in the area of the event and security professionals in surrounding buildings must both have a plan to respond to any catastrophic event.  

Living in a world where we cannot prevent or predict every threat may be the inevitable. As for concertgoers, music brings people together in joy. Whether or not these events stop people from obtaining that joy, our law enforcement and security officials must put disaster plans into place now more than ever.

With all four senseless tragedies that are difficult to understand -- Manchester, Paris, Orlando and Las Vegas -- the one thing we know we can act on, is to be prepared.



 

 

TOTAL SOLAR ECLIPSE: TRUCKING HAZARDS, CROWDS, AIRBNB GIVEAWAY & FESTIVALS

 © [@leekris] / Adobe Stock

© [@leekris] / Adobe Stock

Today's the last day to enter Airbnb's Total Eclipse Giveaway!

THURSDAY // AUGUST 10, 2017

What is it?

According to NASA, on August 21, 2017, North America will see an eclipse of the sun. Anyone lucky enough to fall within the Path of Totality will see a total solar eclipse, where the moon completely covers the sun for approximately two minutes and forty seconds.

The Path of Totality covers the following 14 states: Oregon, Idaho, Wyoming, Montana, Nebraska, Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Illinois, Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia, North Carolina and South Carolina. The last time a total eclipse has occurred in the United States was in 1979.

Traffic Hazard Concerns

Freightwaves.com reported that the eclipse may cause potential dangers for all Americans on the road involving distracted drivers and a total eclipse of the road, causing people to pull over on dangerous shoulders.

In fact, the Federal Highway Administration released a fact sheet that says 200 million people, or a little less than ⅔ of the country, live within the Path of Totality. They also advise that August 21 is not the day to schedule work zones and detours. Click here for a list of driving safety tips during the eclipse.

Crowds & Festivals

According to KGW, more than 100 festivals and events will take place in several cities across the country before and after the day of the eclipse. Keep in mind, the eclipse will only last two minutes and forty seconds. That doesn’t stop these towns from throwing some serious parties.

Oregon is the very first state to view the total eclipse. The Oregon SolarFest in Madres is a four-day festival to celebrate. The small town’s 325 hotel rooms and 5,000 campsites have been fully booked for over two years. Oregon’s Willamette University will hold a viewing party with American Astronomical Society scientists who are willing to answer one-on-one questions.

Jefferson, Missouri is holding a three-day festival including pub crawls, fun runs, street parties and BBQs. SolFest 2017 in Nebraska will celebrate with food, drinks and various forms of entertainment.

The Amelia Earhart Airport in Kansas even offers plane rides at their Eclipse Air Fest. First Tennessee Park will boast science demonstrations and performances by the Nashville Symphony. South Carolina, is the last state to view the eclipse, with viewing parties in Charleston museums, and wrapping it up with a DJ beach blowout on the Isle of Palms.

Just when you thought it couldn’t get any more ridiculous, Krispy Kreme is offering a first-time-ever chocolate glazed eclipse-themed donut. This tasty treat is available from August 19 to August 21.

Airbnb Total Solar Eclipse Experience Giveaway

Hurry up and enter before 11:59pm tonight (8/10), for a chance to win the ultimate experience for two in a geodesic dome situated in the Oregon wilderness. The trip includes boarding a private jet to view the eclipse above the clouds.

One day prior to the eclipse, two lucky winners will dwell in a geodesic dome near Smith Rock. The dome will be furnished with several telescopes on the observation deck.

Hosted by Dr. Jedidah Isler, a National Geographic Explorer and international scholar, you will spend dinner under the stars and ask her any questions about outer space. You will also have a chance to meet Babak Tafreshi, a National Geographic photographer and science journalist, who will teach proper skills on photographing the sky.

The next morning, you’ll launch into the sky on a private jet and fly along the Path of Totality, being one of the very first people to view the eclipse of a lifetime.


Enter here: https://www.airbnb.com/night-at/solareclipse

 

YOUR GUIDE TO COACHELLA 2016

YOUR GUIDE TO COACHELLA 2016

So you’re finally going to Coachella this year? Welcome to the not-so-exclusive club! Now comes the hard part – planning your trip. You’ll have to figure out where to stay, what to pack, how to get there, and who to see.  That’s why we put together this little cheat sheet to make the most out of your Coachella experience. You’re welcome!

THE MOST ANTICIPATED TOURS & FESTIVALS OF 2016

THE MOST ANTICIPATED TOURS & FESTIVALS OF 2016

While 2015 was filled with amazing shows, it is time to say hello to bigger and better things in 2016! From Adele’s sold out tour to a Guns N’ Roses reunion to Rihanna’s long-delayed album Anti, we can’t wait to see what 2016 has in store. So we’ve put together a list of the most anticipated Tours and Festivals of 2016 to help you jump on a gig and get on the road....